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Long-acting injectable ARVs are convenient and private, study participants report
by Roger Pebody, 2018-01-17 11:40
HIV-positive people who took injectable cabotegravir + rilpivirine every four or eight weeks as antiretroviral therapy found it more convenient and discreet than daily pills, also feeling that it eliminated a “daily reminder of living with HIV”, Deanna Kerrigan and colleagues report in PLOS One. Similarly, HIV-negative men who took injectable cabotegravir every 12

Hepatitis C treatment highly effective in harder-to-treat people with HIV co-infection, Spanish real-life study shows
by Michael Carter, 2018-01-16 11:10
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment using direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) is highly effective and safe in harder-to-treat people with HIV co-infection, Spanish researchers report in AIDS. A sustained virological response (SVR), or cure, was observed in 93% of people and only 0.4% stopped treatment because of adverse events. The large proportion

Hepatitis C treatment highly effective in harder-to-treat HIV coinfected patients, Spanish real-life study shows
by Michael Carter, 2018-01-16 11:10
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment using direct-acting agents (DAAs) is highly effective and safe in harder-to-treat HIV co-infected patients, Spanish researchers report in AIDS. A sustained virological response (SVR), or cure, was observed in 93% of patients and only 0.4% stopped treatment because of adverse events. The large proportion of

Attitudes towards men who ‘bareback’ are a barrier to wider use of PrEP
by Roger Pebody, 2018-01-15 07:00
Two new qualitative studies from Toronto shed light on how stigma affects the uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and the experience of taking it. In the first, young gay men acknowledged that they did not always use condoms but did not see themselves as the kind of ‘barebacker’ for whom they thought PrEP was

Faster action on adherence is needed after viral load becomes detectable, researchers warn global treatment programmes
by Keith Alcorn, 2018-01-12 07:10
Low-level HIV viral load, above the limit of detection, is an important warning signal for future treatment failure and World Health Organization guidelines on spotting treatment failure need to be revised to encourage greater vigilance and swifter action by healthcare providers in lower- and middle-income settings, investigators report in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The study,